Medicare Advantage

Daratumumab (Darzalex®), Daratumumab, and Hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro®)
MA08.079i

Policy

The Company reserves the right to reimburse only those services that are furnished in the most appropriate and cost-effective setting that is appropriate to the member’s medical needs and condition.

MEDICALLY NECESSARY

MULTIPLE MYELOMA
Newly Diagnosed

Daratumumab (Darzalexand daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) are considered medically necessary and, therefore, covered for individuals who have been newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma, when any of the following criteria have been met:
  • The individual is ineligible for autologous stem cell transplant, and daratumumab is used with either of the following combinations:
    • ​bortezomib (Velcade), melphalan ​hydrochloride (Alkeran), and prednisone
    • lenalidomide (Revlimid) and dexamethasone (an National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN-preferred] regimen) 
  • The individual is eligible for autologous stem cell transplant, and daratumumab is used with either of the following combinations:
    • bortezomib (Velcade)dexamethasone, and either lenalidomide (Revlimid)​ or thalidomide (Thalomid
    • cyclophosphamide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone

Monotherapy for Relapsed, Progressive, or Refractory Disease

Daratumumab (Darzalex) and daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) are considered medically necessary and, therefore, covered as monotherapy for the treatment of relapsed, progressive, or refractory multiple myeloma when either of the following criteria have been met:
  • The individual has previously received at least three prior lines of therapy, including a proteasome inhibitor (PI)1 AND an immunomodulatory agent2
  • The individual is double-refractory to a PI1 AND an immunomodulatory agent2 (i.e., disease progression on or within 60 days of the last dose of each agent)

Combination Therapy for Relapsed, Progressive, or Refractory Disease

Daratumumab (Darzalexand daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) are considered medically necessary and, therefore, covered for the treatment of relapsed, progressive, or refractory multiple myeloma, in ​combination with ​one of the following regimens:
  • At least one prior therapy and daratumumab is used in combination with any of the following:
    • Bortezomib (Velcade®) and dexamethasone (an NCCN-preferred regimen)
    • Lenalidomide (Revlimid) and dexamethasone (an NCCN-preferred regimen) 
    • carfilzomib (Kyprolis) and dexamethasone (an NCCN-preferred regimen)
    • cyclophosphamide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone​
  • At least two prior therapies including an immunomodulatory agent2 ​and a proteasome inhibitor1, and daratumumab is used in combination with pomalidomide (Pomalyst) and dexamethasone
  • At least four prior therapies including two immunomodulatory agents2, two proteasome inhibitors1, an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody (e.g., daratumumab), and daratumumab is used in combination with selinexor (Xpovio)​ and dexamethasone

1Examples of proteasome inhibitors (PI) include bortezomib (Velcade), carfilzomib (Kyprolis) and ixazomib (Ninlaro)

2Examples of immunomodulary agents include lenalidomide (Revlimid), pomalidomide (Pomalyst), and thalidomide (Thalomid)

SYSTEMIC LIGHT CHAIN AMYLOIDOSIS
Daratumumab (Darzalex) and daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) are considered medically necessary and, therefore, covered for the treatment of relapsed or refractory disease ​as a single agent.

Daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) is considered medically necessary and, therefore, covered as the NCCN-preferred treatment for newly diagnosed disease, or relapsed/refractory disease as a repeat of initial therapy if relapse-free for several years, in combination with bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone.  
EXPERIMENTAL/INVESTIGATIONAL

All other uses for daratumumab (Darzalex), daratumumab, and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) are considered experimental/investigational and, therefore, not covered because their safety and/or effectiveness cannot be established by review of the available published peer-reviewed literature.

REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION

The individual's medical record must reflect the medical necessity for the care provided. These medical records may include, but are not limited to: records from the professional provider's office, hospital, nursing home, home health agencies, therapies, and test reports.

The Company may conduct reviews and audits of services to our members, regardless of the participation status of the provider. All documentation is to be available to the Company upon request. Failure to produce the requested information may result in a denial for the drug.

Guidelines

There is no Medicare coverage determination addressing daratumumab (Darzalex), daratumumab and Hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro); therefore, the Company policy is applicable.

BENEFIT APPLICATION

Subject to the terms and conditions of the applicable Evidence of Coverage, daratumumab (Darzalex), daratumumab, and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) are covered under the medical benefits of the Company’s Medicare Advantage products when the medical necessity criteria listed in this medical policy are met.

US FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION (FDA) STATUS

Daratumumab (Darzalex) for intravenous administration was approved by the FDA on November 16, 2015 for the treatment of individuals with multiple myeloma who have received at least three prior lines of therapy including a proteasome inhibitor (PI) and an immunomodulatory agent or who are double-refractory to a PI and an immunomodulatory agent. Supplemental approvals for daratumumab (Darzalex) have since been issued by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 

Daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) for subcutaneous administration was approved by the FDA on May 1, 2020 for the treatment of adults patients with multiple myeloma:
  • in combination with bortezomib, melphalan and prednisone in newly diagnosed patients who are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplant
  • in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in newly diagnosed patients who are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplant and in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy
  • in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients who have received at least one prior therapy
  • as monotherapy, in patients who have received at least three prior lines of therapy including a proteasome inhibitor (PI) and an immunomodulatory agent or who are double-refractory to a PI and an immunomodulatory agent
Supplemental approvals for daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) have since been issued by the FDA.

PEDIATRIC USE

The safety and effectiveness of daratumumab (Darzalex) and daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) in pediatric individuals have not been established.

Description

Like many types of malignancies, further treatment of multiple myeloma after relapsed, progressive, or refractory disease usually yields a shorter duration and lower quality of response compared to the initial response. There is a high demand for agents that treat multiple myeloma that does not respond or that progresses after first- or subsequent-line therapy.

On November 16, 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted approval of daratumumab (Darzalex), an intravenous (IV) monoclonal antibody, for the treatment of individuals with multiple myeloma who have received at least three prior lines of therapy including a proteasome inhibitor (PI) and an immunomodulatory agent, or who are double-refractory to a PI and an immunomodulatory agent.

On May 1, 2020, the FDA granted approval of daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro), a subcutaneous (SC) formulation with almost the same indications as the IV formulation. It is available as a flat-dose, administered by a professional provider over three to five minutes. Hyaluronidase increases the dispersion and absorption of the daratumumab when administered SC.

CD38 is a glycoprotein expressed on the surface of hematopoietic cells (including lymphoid and myeloid cells). When multiple myeloma is present, there is an overexpression of CD38 on malignant plasma cells. Daratumumab (Darzalex) works by binding to CD38 and inhibiting the growth of the malignant tumor cells through multiple mechanisms, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) (causing tumor cell lysis and death), antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) (causing tumor cell death by non-phagocytic processes via the activation of natural killer cells, macrophages, etc.), and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by macrophages.

PEER-REVIEWED LITERATURE

SUMMARY OF LIGHT CHAIN AMYLOIDOSIS STUDIES  
Daratumumab and Hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) in Combination with Bortezomib, Cyclophsphamide, and Dexamathasone (VCd)

An open-label, randomized, active-controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) in 388 individuals with newly diagnosed light chain (AL) amyloidosis. One group received daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) 1,800 mg/30,000 units SC weekly from weeks 1-8, once every 2 weeks from weeks 9-24, and once every 4 weeks starting with week 25 (until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, or a maximum of two years) in combination with bortezomib, cyclophsphamide, and dexamathasone (D-VCd) (N=195), and the other group received VCd (N=193). Hematologic complete response was significantly improved in 42% of D-VCd compared to 13% in VCd group (p<0.0001). 

SUMMARY OF MULTIPLE MYELOMA STUDIES  
Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma: Daratumumab (Darzalex) in Combination with Bortezomib, Melphalan, and Prednisone (VMP) or Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone in Individuals Ineligible for Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

The approval for daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisone (VMP) for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma was based on an open-label, randomized, active-controlled, Phase 3 study of 706 individuals (ALCYONE study). Individuals were randomized to treatment with either daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with VMP (D-VMP group) or to treatment with VMP alone. The study showed an improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) in the D-VMP arm as compared to the VMP arm; the median PFS had not been reached in the D-VMP arm and was 18.1 months in the VMP arm (p<0.0001), representing 50 percent reduction in the risk of disease progression or death in individuals treated with D-VMP.

On June 27, the FDA approved daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone for the treatment of individuals with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). The approval is based on results from the phase III MAIA clinical trial, which showed that the addition of daratumumab to lenalidomide/dexamethasone significantly reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 44 percent compared with treatment with lenalidomide/dexamethasone alone.

The randomized, open-label, multicenter phase III study included 737 newly diagnosed individuals with multiple myeloma who are ineligible for high-dose chemotherapy and ASCT between the ages of 45 and 90. Individuals were randomly assigned to receive either daratumumab plus lenalidomide/dexamethasone or lenalidomide/dexamethasone alone in 28-day cycles.

At a median follow-up of 28.0 months, disease progression or death had occurred in 240 individuals (97 of 368 [26.4 percent] in the daratumumab group and 143 of 369 [38.8 percent] in the control group). The estimated percentage of individuals who were alive without disease progression at 30 months was 70.6 percent (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 65.0 to 75.4) in the daratumumab group and 55.6 percent (95 percent CI, 49.5 to 61.3) in the control group (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.56; 95 percent CI, 0.43 to 0.73; P<0.001). The percentage of individuals with a complete response or better was 47.6 percent in the daratumumab group and 24.9 percent in the control group (P<0.001). A total of 24.2 percent of the individuals in the daratumumab group, as compared with 7.3 percent of the individuals in the control group, had results below the threshold for minimal residual disease (one tumor cell per 105 white cells) (P<0.001).

Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma: Daratumumab and Hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) in Combination with Bortezomib, Melphalan, and Prednisone (VMP) or Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone in Individuals Ineligible for Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

The approval for daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) in combination with bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisone (VMP) for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in individuals who were ineligible for transplant was based on a single-arm, open-label, Phase II study of 67 individuals (PLEIADES study). Participants received bortezomib, melphalan, and daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) at 1,800 mg/30,000 units subcutaneously (SC) once weekly from weeks one to six, once every three weeks from weeks seven to 54, and once every four weeks starting with week 55 until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The study showed an overall response rate (ORR) of 88%.

The approval for daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone for the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in individuals who were ineligible for transplant was based on a single-arm, open-label, Phase II study of 65 individuals (PLEIADES study). Participants received lenalidomide, dexamethasone, and daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) at 1,800 mg/30,000 units subcutaneously (SC) once weekly from weeks one to eight, once every two weeks from weeks nine to 24, and once every four weeks starting with week 25 until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The study showed an overall response rate (ORR) of 91%.

Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma: Daratumumab (Darzalex) In Combination with Bortezomib, Thalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Individuals Eligible for Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

On September 26, 2019, the FDA approved daratumumab (Darzalex) for multiple myeloma in combination with bortezomib, thalidomide, and dexamethasone in newly diagnosed individuals who are eligible for ASCT. Efficacy was investigated in CASSIOPEIA, an open-label, randomized, active-controlled phase 3 study comparing induction and consolidation treatment with daratumumab 16 mg/kg in combination with bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone (D-VTd) (n=543) to treatment with bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone (VTd) (n=542) in individuals with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma eligible for ASCT. Approval is based on data from CASSIOPEIA, including progression-free survival (PFS), stringent complete response at 100 days post-ASCT, and complete response rate at day 100 post-ASCT. The trial demonstrated an improvement in PFS in the D-VTd arm as compared to the VTd arm; with a median follow up of 18.8 months, the median PFS had not been reached in either arm. Treatment with D-VTd resulted in a reduction in the risk of progression or death by 53 percent compared to VTd alone (HR=0.47; 95 percent CI:0.33, 0.67; p<0.0001). The sCR rate at Day 100 post-ASCT was 28.9 percent in the D-VTd arm and 20.3 percent in the VTd arm. There were no significant differences in the number or type of serious adverse events in the two treatment arms. D-VTd before and after autologous stem-cell transplantation improved depth of response and progression-free survival with acceptable safety. CASSIOPEIA is the first study showing the clinical benefit of daratumumab (Darzalex) plus standard of care in transplant-eligible individuals with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.


Monotherapy for Multiple Myeloma After Three Prior Lines of Therapy

Daratumumab (Darzalex)
The approval of daratumumab (Darzalex) was based on the results of a two-part, open-label, multicenter, Phase 2 study. Enrolled in the trial were individuals who had responded to at least one previous treatment regimen, received an alkylating agent alone or in combination with other myeloma treatments, received at least three previous lines of treatment that included a proteasome inhibitor and an immunomodulatory drug, or had disease double-refractory to the most recent proteasome inhibitor and immunomodulatory drug they had received. (Refractory disease was defined as disease progression on or within 60 days of the last dose). All individuals had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status score of 2 or lower.

Part 1 was a dose-defining study of 34 individuals randomized (1:1) to either daratumumab (Darzalex) 8 mg/kg every four weeks or 16 mg/kg weekly for eight weeks, then 16 mg/kg every two weeks for 16 weeks, then 16 mg/kg every four weeks. A first interim analysis was performed about eight weeks after the last individual's enrollment; at that time, the individual could crossover to the more effective dose if appropriate. A second interim analysis was conducted after another 25 individuals were treated for at least eight weeks.

Part 2 was an expansion cohort of 65 individuals which brought the total number of individuals in the study to 106. All individuals were administered the optimal dose of 16 mg/kg weekly for eight weeks, then 16 mg/kg every two weeks for 16 weeks, then 16 mg/kg every four weeks thereafter.

The primary efficacy endpoint was overall response rate (ORR), which is a measurement of a positive response to treatment. In this study the ORR was the sum of partial response, very good partial response, complete response, and stringent complete response. The results concluded that the ORR was 29.2 percent, and there was a median duration of response of 7.4 months.

Daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro)
The approval for daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) as monotherapy in individuals who received at least three previous lines of treatment that included a proteasome inhibitor and an immunomodulatory drug, or had disease double-refractory to the most recent proteasome inhibitor and immunomodulatory drug they had received was based on the COLUMBIA study, an open-label, randomized (1:1), non-inferiority, Phase III study. Participants (N=522) were randomized to receive either daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) 1,800 mg/30,000 units SC or daratumumab (Darzalex) 16 mg/kg IV; each administered once weekly (cycles one and two), every two weeks (cycles three through six), and then every 4 weeks (28-day cycles) until progressive disease or toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoints were overall response rate (ORR) and maximum Ctrough concentration at pre-dose Cycle 3 Day 1. The study resulted in non-inferiority in terms of ORR (SC route 41%, IV route 37%) and maximum trough concentration. Median progression-free survival was 5.6 months in the SC arm and 6.1 months in the IV arm. Overall, 296 participants discontinued treatment, mainly due to progressive disease (112 [43%] of 260 in the subcutaneous group and 114 [44%] of 258 in the intravenous group.)

In Combination with Carfilzomib (Kyprolis) and Dexamethasone for Multiple Myeloma After at Least One to Three Prior Lines of Therapy

The safety and efficacy of daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with twice-weekly carfilzomib (Kyprolis) and dexamethasone ​was established in CANDOR, a phase 3, randomized, multicenter, open-label study of 466 participants that evaluated daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with twice-weekly  carfilzomib (Kyprolis) (DKd) and dexamethasone ​compared to carfilzomib (Kyprolis) and dexamethasone​ (Kd) in those with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma who had recevied at least 1 to 3 prior treatments. Participants had received a median of 2 prior teatments and 58% of participants ​had received prior autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). DKd demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in PFS compared to Kd arm; the median PFS had not been reached in DKd arm and was 15.8 months in Kd arm (P=0.0014), which represented a 37% reduction in the risk of disease progression or death or those treated with DKd compared to Kd. 


The safety and efficacy of daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with once-weekly carfilzomib (Kyprolis) and dexamethasone ​was established in EQUULEUS, an open-label, multi-cohort trial of 85 participants that evaluated daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with once-weekly carfilzomib (Kyprolis) (DKd) and dexamethasone in those with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma who had recevied at least 1 to 3 prior treatments. Participants had received a median of 2 prior teatments and 73% of participants ​had received prior ASCT. DKd demonstrated an overall response rate in 69 participants (81%). ​


In Combination with Lenalidomide (Revlimid) or Bortezomib (Velcade) and Dexamethasone for Multiple Myeloma After at Least One Prior Line of Therapy

Daratumumab (Darzalex)​    
The approval of daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with lenalidomide (Revlimid) and dexamethasone for the treatment of multiple myeloma after one prior therapy was based on a Phase 3, randomized, open-label trial in 569 individuals. These individuals had relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma and received one or more previous lines of therapy. They were assigned to receive either daratumumab, lenalidomide and dexamethasone (daratumumab group, n=286), or lenalidomide and dexamethasone (control group, n=283). The primary endpoint of this study was progression-free survival. At a median follow-up of 13.5 months, there was a total of 169 events of disease progression or death; 53 (18.5 percent) in daratumumab group and 116 (41 percent) in the control group. The median progression-free survival was not reached in the daratumumab group, as compared to 18.4 months in the control group; however, the rate of progression-free survival at 12 months was 85.7 percent in the daratumumab group versus 63.2 percent in the control group. In conclusion, the group treated with daratumumab experienced a significant progression-free survival and higher rates of overall response in individuals with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. The daratumumab group did have higher rates of adverse reactions (including neutropenia and infusion-related reactions), but this did not result in increased treatment discontinuation or death.

The use of daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with bortezomib (Velcade) and dexamethasone for multiple myeloma was approved based on a phase 3, open-label, randomized, multicenter trial. 498 individuals with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma were randomly assigned bortezomib and dexamethasone (control group) or daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone (dartumumab group). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival, which was defined as the time from the date of randomization to date of disease progression or death. At a median follow-up period of 7.4 months, a total of 189 events of disease progression or death had occurred; 67 in daratumumab group and 122 in the control group. The 12-month progression-free survival was 60.7 percent in the daratumumab group versus 26.9 percent in the control group. The overall response rate, which was a secondary endpoint of the study, was 82.9 percent in the daratumumab group and 63.2 percent in the control group. In conclusion, this study determined that, for individuals with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, the combination of daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone resulted in significantly longer progression-free survival than bortezomib and dexamethasone alone. Additionally, the daratumumab group did experience infusion-related reactions (i.e., dyspnea, bronchospasm, and cough) and higher rates of thrombocytopenia and neutropenia.


Daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) 

The approval for daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) in combination with lenalidomide (Revlimid) and dexamethasone for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma was based on a single-arm cohort of PLEIADES, a multi-cohort, open-label trial in 65 participants who received daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) 1,800 mg/30,000 units SC weekly from weeks 1-8, once every 2 weeks from weeks 9-24, and once every 4 weeks starting with week 25 until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, in combination with lenalidomide ​and dexamethasone. The overall response rate was achieved ​in 59 participants (91%). 

In Combination with Pomalidomide (Pomalyst) and Dexamethasone for Multiple Myeloma After Two Prior Therapies Including Lenalidomide and a Proteasome Inhibitor

Approval for daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone for the treatment of multiple myeloma was based on EQUULEUS, an open-label trial including 103 individuals ​who had recevied prior PI and an immunomodulatory agent. The overall response rate (ORR) was 60 percent with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 8.8 months, 12 month PFS of 42 percent, and median time to progression of 10.4 months.

OFF-LABEL INDICATIONS

There may be additional indications contained in the Policy section of this document due to evaluation of criteria highlighted in the Company’s off-label policy, and/or review of clinical guidelines issued by leading professional organizations and government entities.​


References

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Daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro). Elsevier’s Clinical Pharmacology Compendium. [Clinical Key Web site]. 01/25/2021. Available at: https://www.clinicalkey.com/pharmacology/monograph/5217?sec=monindi&n=DARZALEX FASPRO [via subscription only]. Accessed April 9, 2021.

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Facon T, Kumar S, Plesner T, et al: Daratumumab plus lenalidomide and dexamethasone for untreated myeloma. N Engl J Med.2019;380(22):2104-2115.

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Kaufman GP, Schrier SL, Lafayette RA, et al. Daratumumab Yields Rapid and Deep Hematologic Responses in Patients With Heavily Pretreated AL Amyloidosis. Blood 2017;130:900-902.

Lonial SWeiss BMUsmani SZ, et al. Daratumumab monotherapy in patients with treatment-refractory multiple myeloma (SIRIUS): an open-label, randomised, phase 2 trial. Lancet. 2016 Jan 6. pii: S0140-6736(15)01120-4. [Epub ahead of print].

Mateos M-V, Nahi H, Legiec W, et al. Subcutaneous versus intravenous daratumumab in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (COLUMBA): a multicentre, open-label, non-inferiority, randomised, phase 3 trial. Lancet Haematol2020 May;7(5):e370-e380.

National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology - Multiple Myeloma (version 5.2021). 03/15/2021. [NCCN Web site].  Available at: http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp#myeloma [via free subscription]. Accessed April 8, 2021.

National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology - Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis (version 2.2021). 02/08/2021. [NCCN Web site]. ​ Available at: https://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/amyloidosis.pdf [via free subscription]. Accessed April 8, 2021.

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Rajkumar SV. Multiple myeloma: Treatment of relapsed or refractory disease. [UpToDate Web site]. 03/30/2021. Available at: http://www.uptodate.com/contents/treatment-of-relapsed-or-refractory-multiple-myeloma?source=search_result&search=daratumumab&selectedTitle=4~10. Accessed April 9, 2021.

US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. daratumumab (Darzalex) drug label [FDA Web site]. 03/12/2021. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/daf/ . Accessed April 8, 2021.

US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj (Darzalex Faspro) drug label [FDA Web site]. 03/12/2021​. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/daf/ . Accessed April 8, 2021.


Coding

CPT Procedure Code Number(s)
N/A

ICD - 10 Procedure Code Number(s)
N/A

ICD - 10 Diagnosis Code Number(s)

C90.00 Multiple myeloma not having achieved remission

C90.01 Multiple myeloma in remission

C90.02 Multiple myeloma in relapse

E85.51 Light chain (AL) amyloidosis

HCPCS Level II Code Number(s)

J9144 Injection, daratumumab, 10 mg and hyaluronidase-fihj​

J9145 Injection, daratumumab, 10 mg




Revenue Code Number(s)
N/A



Coding and Billing Requirements




Policy History

6/7/2021
6/7/2021
MA08.079
Medical Policy Bulletin
Medicare Advantage
No